Category Archives: Around the Wicket Gate

Chapter 1 : Around the Wicket Gate – Awakening

~ Around the Wicket Gate ~
Almost Saved, But Altogether Lost


In chapter 1, Spurgeon addresses the widespread apathy toward eternal matters, highlighting the importance of being awakened to one’s spiritual condition. He stresses that such awakening is often the first step toward salvation but warns against the danger of returning to spiritual slumber. Spurgeon emphasizes that true salvation requires moving beyond mere awareness of sin to actively seeking Christ’s redemption. Through various analogies, he illustrates the folly of remaining in a state of conviction without progressing to faith, urging readers to seize the opportunity for salvation immediately.


The following are select quotes from this chapter.
Please use the comment section below to share your own thoughts regarding this book!

Great numbers of people have no concern  about eternal things.  They care more about their cats and dogs than about their souls. It is a great mercy to be made to think about ourselves and how we stand in relation to God and the eternal world. This is often a sign that salvation is coming to us. By nature, we do not like the anxiety that spiritual concern causes us, and we try, like sluggards, to sleep again. This is great foolishness; for it is at our peril that we trifle when death is so near and judgment is so sure. If the Lord has chosen us to eternal life, he will not let us return to our slumber. If we are sensible, we will pray that our anxiety about our souls may never come to an end until we are really  and truly  saved.

Charles Haddon Spurgeon

Preface : Around the Wicket Gate

~ Around the Wicket Gate ~
Almost Saved, But Altogether Lost


“Enter by the narrow gate.”—Matthew 7:13

In this preface, Charles Spurgeon addresses those who are close to entering the path of salvation but hesitate at the threshold. Drawing inspiration from John Bunyan’s “The Pilgrim’s Progress,” Spurgeon uses the metaphor of the “wicket gate” to represent the entrance to the way of life. He highlights the peril of being “almost saved, but altogether lost,” and expresses his earnest hope that this book will guide many to faith in Christ.


The following are select quotes from this chapter.
Please use the comment section below to share your own thoughts regarding this book!

It will be an awful thing to die just outside the gate of life. Almost saved, but altogether lost! This is the most terrible of positions. A person just outside Noah’s ark would have been drowned; a manslayer close to the wall of the city of refuge, but still outside, would be slain; and the person who is within a yard of Christ, and yet has not trusted in him, will be lost. Therefore, I am deeply earnest to get my hesitating friends over the threshold.

Charles Haddon Spurgeon